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What Should I Know, If I Need to Take an Elderly Person to the Doctor?

Restrictions for visitors, including caregivers, have eased since the spring and exceptions are made more readily, according to doctors around the country. Still, helping older loved ones navigate their health care under COVID-19 precautions and restrictions can be complicated.

First, know and understand the rules in the pandemic.

AARP’s August 17 article entitled “4 Things to Know When Taking a Loved One to the Doctor During COVID-19” provides four other things to consider as you plan doctors’ appointments.

Is there an urgent need for the appointment? A caregiver of a senior may be tempted to schedule some appointments. However, doctors are trying to return to normal, and even with precautions in place, they may not want to see your senior for a non-urgent visit. Right now, most doctors don’t advise patients to come into their office for routine follow-ups. See if the visit can be postponed or ask the medical office about a virtual visit on Zoom.

Do you know the office’s visitor policy? If the doctor asks you to bring your loved one to the doctor’s office, look at its visitor policy before you go. With COVID-19, most offices have very strict policies and may only permit scheduled patients in the office. Some will make exceptions for a senior’s caregiver if needed, but they may request that once the patient is checked in, the caregiver wait in the car.

What are the facility’s precautions against COVID-19? In most health care facilities, as well as in imaging centers, doctors’ offices, hospitals with outpatient services, ERs and labs, there’s intense facility cleaning and sanitizing, universal masking, physical distancing and hand sanitizing. Patients are typically met at the door with a thermometer and a COVID-19 questionnaire. Other precautions include removing magazines to protect against the risk of virus transmission and requiring all staff to wear surgical masks.

What preparation is needed for an in-person appointment? Both the caregiver and patient should wear masks and get there punctually. When you make the appointment and it is prep for a scheduled surgery or procedure, ask if the patient needs a COVID-19 test.

You should also bring a list of medications with dosages and frequencies (and the number of refills left.). It is also helpful to have on hand a medical history that includes symptoms, dates and durations. This can be valuable in completing the COVID-19 questionnaire and to get more from the appointment. You should also have a list of questions for the doctor.

When you leave the appointment, be certain: (i) all of the patient’s questions have been answered; (ii) review the instructions for home care provided in the treatment plan; and (iii) schedule the next appointment, if a follow-up is needed.

Reference: AARP (Aug. 17, 2020) “4 Things to Know When Taking a Loved One to the Doctor During COVID-19”

Suggested Key Terms: Elder Law Attorney, Assisted Living, Elder Care, Caregiving, COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

About the author

Michael Huguelet

Coming from, and continuing in, a large family, Mike fully appreciates his clients’ desire to protect their hard earned legacies after they are gone, while at the same time, providing protection for their legacies during the rest of their lives, taking into account the issues of aging, health care and wealth management.